BWH COMPUTATIONAL PATHOLOGY

Our Mission

Improve human health

Our core mission is to alleviate human suffering by reducing the burden of diseases on individuals and on the population. This mission informs all our activities in developing and applying computational technologies, which we leverage to make an impact on a broad range of human diseases including infectious, cancer, heart, kidney, intestinal, autoimmune, allergies, and neurological disorders.

Advance the field of pathology

Pathology is both a scientific and a medical discipline, involving the study of basic mechanisms of diseases and the diagnosis of diseases using tissue and fluid samples. Our goal is to advance the field of pathology through computational technologies, to improve the understanding, diagnosis, and treatment of human diseases. With this broad view of pathology, we work on a variety of applications such as deep learning/artificial intelligence to improve cancer diagnosis/prognosis from histology images and to create new live bacterial therapeutics to treat infectious or autoimmune diseases.

Develop innovative computational methods

Human diseases often have complex causes and effects on the body. Data needed to analyze human diseases is similarly complex and multi-faceted. These data are also often difficult to acquire, leading to relatively limited dataset sizes. These and other challenges necessitate going beyond application of existing computational methods. Thus, we actively engage in computational research, to develop novel computational models, inference algorithms, integrated pipelines, and hardware. To accomplish this, we leverage a variety of advanced computational disciplines, including Bayesian nonparametric statistics, deep learning and control theory.

Division Opportunities

Division News

  • Nov. 14, 2022: Martin Jankowiak, PhD, Broad Institute

    “Inferring selection effects in SARS-CoV-2 with Bayesian Viral Allele Selection,” https://partners.zoom.us/j/86162386947; We develop Bayesian Viral Allele Selection (BVAS), a method that leverages the millions of SARS-CoV-2 viral genomes that have been sequenced across the globe to identify mutations linked to increased viral fitness.

  • Gerber Lab’s “MDITRE: Scalable and Interpretable Machine Learning for Predicting Host Status from Temporal Microbiome Dynamics” is mSystems Editor’s Pick

    Gerber Lab’s “MDITRE: Scalable and Interpretable Machine Learning for Predicting Host Status from Temporal Microbiome Dynamics” is mSystems Editor’s Pick

    Longitudinal microbiome data sets are being generated with increasing regularity, and there is broad recognition that these studies are critical for unlocking the mechanisms through which the microbiome impacts human health and disease. However, there is a dearth of computational tools for analyzing microbiome time-series data. To address this gap, we developed an open-source software […]

  • Mahmood Lab’s Pan-cancer integrative histology-genomic analysis is featured on cover of Cancer Cell

    Mahmood Lab’s Pan-cancer integrative histology-genomic analysis is featured on cover of Cancer Cell

    The rapidly emerging field of computational pathology has demonstrated promise in developing objective prognostic models from histology images. However, most prognostic models are either based on histology or genomics alone and do not address how these data sources can be integrated to develop joint image-omic prognostic models. Additionally, identifying explainable morphological and molecular descriptors from […]

  • The Massachusetts Lab for Artificial Intelligence/Deep Learning for the Microbiome

    The Massachusetts Lab for Artificial Intelligence/Deep Learning for the Microbiome

    Through a $3.3M grant from the Massachusetts Life Science Center and in-kind support from Brigham and Women’s Hospital and Mass General Brigham, the BWH Massachusetts Host-Microbiome Center (MHMC) and Division of Computational Pathology will establish a new lab to develop and apply advanced AI/deep learning technologies to microbiome research. Dr. Georg Gerber, Chief of BWH […]

  • Gerber lab study showing gut metabolites predict C. diff recurrence

    Gerber lab study showing gut metabolites predict C. diff recurrence

    Clostridioides difficile infection (CDI) is the most common hospital acquired infection in the USA, with recurrence rates > 15%. Although primary CDI has been extensively linked to gut microbial dysbiosis, less is known about the factors that promote or mitigate recurrence. Using broad metabolomics data and statistics and machine learning models, Jen Dawkins, a HST PhD […]